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Posts Tagged ‘Metropolitan Museum of Art’

Bryson Burroughs (1869-1934) worked as a curator at the Metropolitan Museum of Art for 28 years in the early 20th century. During his time at the Met, he was responsible for their massive increase in American art holdings, in addition to numerous other achievements including the first acquisition for a public collection of a work by Paul Cezanne (1839-1906). Burroughs’ curatorial decisions and influences were prominent in the advancement of the art market in the early 20th century. Interestingly, his ideas also had a major impact on the NBMAA’s decision to collect solely American art, with a focus on contemporary work.

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Do Women Have to be Naked to Get into the Met. Museum?, 1989. Guerrilla Girls (1985-present). Poster advertisement on the side of a bus.

The Guerrilla Girls were a radical Feminist group that emerged in 1985 as a response to the under-representation of women in the Modern art collections of museums. This poster is the manifestation of the concern after an inner look into the modern artwork at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. After counting the number of nude females against the number of nude males, as well as the number of female artists, the Guerrilla Girls established that even though less than 5% of the artists were female, over 85% of the nude artworks were of females. This prompted the question: do women have to be naked to get into the Met. Museum -or any museum, for that matter? (more…)

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Brooklyn Museum 1916

The exterior of the Brooklyn Museum in 1916, including the original Eastern Parkway staircase.

In this recession economy, the arts have suffered a heavy blow and museums find themselves trying to appeal to as broad an audience as possible just to stay afloat. But who is today’s museumgoer ? How does a museum go about attracting their attention? Beginning in 1699, the Paris Salon was the official art exhibition space of the Académie Royale de Peinture et de Sculpture (French for “Royal Academy of Painting and Sculpture”) and, for a time, the greatest annual art event in the world. It was also a chance for the upper and lower classes to rub elbows—everyone came to the Salon. Does everyone still visit museums today? (more…)

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The Parthenon, 1871. Frederic Edwin Church (1826-1900). Oil on Canvas, 44 1/2 x 72 5/8 in. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, bequest of Maria DeWitt Jesup, from the collection of her husband, Morris K. Jesup, 1914.

When looking at Frederick Edwin Church’s painting The Parthenon, one is reminded of the fact that artists have used other works of art as subject matter for several centuries. The Parthenon is part of seven masterpieces from the Metropolitan Museum of  Art on view until September 2010 at the New Britain Museum of American Art.

The Arch of Constantine with the Collosseum in the Background, ca 1742 – 45. Giovanni Antonio Canal (called Canaletto) (1697-1768). Oil on canvas, 32 1/4 x 48 in. Getty Center, 70.PA.52.

During the Grand Tour era, many Grand tourists would buy paintings by artists like Canaletto. He was famous for his views or vedute of Venice and is said to have used a camera obscura to achieve accurate perspectives in his paintings, yet he would often change his sketches corresponding to his own artistic vision. This can be seen in his painting of the Collosseum where he moved the arch of Constantine so that a beautifully framed view of the Collosseum is created. (more…)

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The New Britain Museum of American Art is pleased to announce a very exciting collaboration with the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Six Hudson River School paintings from the Metropolitan’s American Paintings and Sculpture Department and one by the leading 19th -century genre painter Winslow Homer (1836-1910) will be on view in the New Britain Museum’s Henry and Sharon Martin Gallery from March 13, 2009 through September 2010. Examples by Frederic Church (1826-1900), Asher B. Durand (1796-1886), George Inness (1825-1894) and John Frederick Kensett (1816-1872) are represented along with the Homer.

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