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Posts Tagged ‘Milton Avery’

Washington Square Park, New York City

Washington Square Park, New York City

New York City has hundreds of iconic landmarks, parks, monuments, streets, and buildings. During the early 20th century it was a bustling city, full of excitement, investment, and room for expansion and it quickly became a destination for travelers, immigrants, and artists. Art societies and academics became widely accepted and popular, and popped up all over the city. The depictions of New York increased dramatically throughout this time period. This metropolitan destination  could not be missed by any one in the art world, and many moved there to be part of the burgeoning art scene. Therefore, it is no surprise that dozens of prominent artists in the NBMAA’s collection lived and worked in New York City, and derived endless inspiration from the city. (more…)

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March on the Beach, 1947. Milton Avery (1885-1965). Oil on canvas, 36 x 28 in. New Britain Museum of American Art, Gift of Evangeline Zalstem-Zalessky, 1959.09.

Milton Avery was born in Altmar, New York and moved to Hartford, Connecticut, in 1905 with his family. Avery received his formal training at the Connecticut League of Art Students while supporting himself with a factory job as well as a night placement at the Travelers Insurance Company. Avery’s early landscapes and seascapes of the 1920s have a light palette and atmospheric effect that is reminiscent of the work of the American Impressionists, Ernest Lawson (1873-1939) and John Henry Twachtman (1853-1902). Upon his move to New York in 1925, Avery encountered the works of Henry Matisse (1869-1954) and Pablo Picasso (1881-1973). As a result, he began to simplify his forms into bold areas of close valued color and his work became increasingly abstract. By the mid-1940s Avery developed a mature style that can be characterized by a reduction of elements to their essential forms, an elimination of detail, and surface patterns of flattened shapes, filled with arbitrary color in the manner of Matisse. (more…)

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