Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Pablo Picasso’

This post comes to us from artist and NBMAA docent Ronald Abbe.

Nude Descending a Staircase, No. 2, 1912 by Marcel Duchamp (1887-1968) was among the most radical works exhibited at the 1913 Armory Show. Oil on canvas, 57 7/8 x 35 1/8 in. Philadelphia Museum of Art.

One hundred years ago New Yorkers reacted with shock and awe to the Armory Show of 1913. This was their first encounter with European modernism as represented most notably by Picasso and Matisse.  When the show moved on to Boston and Chicago the reception slipped to actual dismay.  Students at the Art Institute of Chicago burned paintings by Matisse (in effigy).

(more…)

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Man Ray, 1974. Andy Warhol (1928-1987). Acrylic polymer and silkscreen on canvas, 14 ¼ x 11 in. New Britain Museum of American Art, Friends Purchase Fund, 1979.084.

Man Ray, 1974. Andy Warhol (1928-1987). Acrylic polymer and silkscreen on canvas, 14 ¼ x 11 in. New Britain Museum of American Art, Friends Purchase Fund, 1979.084.

The last three years in the global art market have seen massive changes. The overall leaders have completely changed, with China rising from third and fourth place in the last decade to first in 2010. Meanwhile, France seems to be in a downward spiral, hard-pressed for a solution to fix its market. Their history has been prosperous in the past, but the 20th century has been less than kind. American art is still a viable commodity within the global market, however, as can be seen by Andy Warhol’s “performance” in 2010.

The taste of an art audience varies year by year, and with the 1991 crash and recovery shifting the focus from what was popular towhat sells. Fast forward to 2007, and the dominance of Pablo Picasso (1881-1973) and Andy Warhol (1928-1987) on the art market, intermixed with a few Impressionist, as well as a massive Chinese influence-all of which helped to form the art world into a global economy that is approaching 10 billion dollars per year. Andy Warhol is at the forefront of these sales, with his revenue alone in 2010 being his all time high of $313, 535, 564. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Le déjeuner sur l'herbe, 1863. Edouard Manet (1832-1883). Oil on canvas, 208 x 264.5 cm. Musée d'Orsay, RF 1668.

When reading our recent post on the NBMAA’s new acquisition of a work by William T. Wiley, one is reminded of another re-interpreted painting, Le déjeuner sur l’herbe by Edouard Manet. However, the Wiley and Manet are opposites. While the Wiley is a modern reinterpretation of a masterpiece by a Northern Renaissance master, the Manet is the original from the 1860s that has inspired dozens of reinterpretations over the past 150 years. (more…)

Read Full Post »