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Posts Tagged ‘tate modern’

Man Ray, 1974. Andy Warhol (1928-1987). Acrylic polymer and silkscreen on canvas, 14 ¼ x 11 in. New Britain Museum of American Art, Friends Purchase Fund, 1979.084.

Man Ray, 1974. Andy Warhol (1928-1987). Acrylic polymer and silkscreen on canvas, 14 ¼ x 11 in. New Britain Museum of American Art, Friends Purchase Fund, 1979.084.

The last three years in the global art market have seen massive changes. The overall leaders have completely changed, with China rising from third and fourth place in the last decade to first in 2010. Meanwhile, France seems to be in a downward spiral, hard-pressed for a solution to fix its market. Their history has been prosperous in the past, but the 20th century has been less than kind. American art is still a viable commodity within the global market, however, as can be seen by Andy Warhol’s “performance” in 2010.

The taste of an art audience varies year by year, and with the 1991 crash and recovery shifting the focus from what was popular towhat sells. Fast forward to 2007, and the dominance of Pablo Picasso (1881-1973) and Andy Warhol (1928-1987) on the art market, intermixed with a few Impressionist, as well as a massive Chinese influence-all of which helped to form the art world into a global economy that is approaching 10 billion dollars per year. Andy Warhol is at the forefront of these sales, with his revenue alone in 2010 being his all time high of $313, 535, 564. (more…)

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Sunflower Seeds, 2010. Ai Weiwei (b.1957). Temporary installation at the Turbine Hall of the Tate Modern, London.

You might have heard about Ai Weiwei’s Sunflower Seeds, an installation in the Turbine Hall of the Tate Modern in London, England. Initially, visitors were encouraged to interact with the artwork but due to health and safety concerns the museum decided to close access to the public. Now, the work can be viewed from a bridge that goes across the gallery or from behind a rope. This is the third show at the Tate that experienced safety issues. The first occured in 2006 when visitors were injured in Carsten Höller’s exhibit of Test Site. This was an installation of a series of slides-the longest one being 58 meters (approximately 190.2 feet) long. The second issue arose during Doris Salcedo’s Shibboleth when three visitors fell into the crack on the floor. (more…)

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Roxy Paine on the Roof: Malestrom, 2009. Metropolitan Museum of Art, NYC.

Installation art can be defined as an artistic genre of site-specific, three-dimensional works designed to transform the perception of a space. Since the 1960s and 70s, this medium of artwork has evolved and manifested itself in museums and galleries as well as public and private spaces across the globe. While installation art was born out of more traditional practices of artwork, it has a completely different approach. Most paintings are presented as snapshots of life or a specific vision and are hung on a neutral wall. Conversely, installations take into account the viewer’s entire sensory experience and seek to create a complete environment that the viewer becomes a part of. (more…)

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